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02

Jul
2014

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In Single Dwelling

By admin

Little Bay House

On 02, Jul 2014 | No Comments | In Single Dwelling | By admin

The little bay house is one of the recently completed luxury residential house project by Zouk Architects. The project went through complex analysis of the site environments and surroundings, controls and regulations from council as well as the Little Bay design committee. The shape and envelope of the house is naturally formed to complement its sloping site as well as making sure important issues such as privacy and views are well controlled, lighting and ventilation are met according to BASIX requirements.

The design of this coastal home in Little Bay is expressed in horizontal form with strong and minimal design connecting indoor and outdoor living spaces. It is solid and secure, “blocky” in relationship to the ground which is further emphasized with expressed slab/roof profile. Careful attention is put towards the form, variation in materials and color creates interesting juxtaposition of aesthetics variation of the development, without it becoming overbearing or out of context.

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Show your own identity through this material!

On 19, Mar 2014 | One Comment | In 2. Tips & Guides, 4. Others | By admin

A simple yet full of characteristic material, yes, it is the Ventilation Block; it is also known as decorative block, breeze block, pattern block or screen wall block. This product has been in the market for more than 30 years and is making a comeback.

The breeze block is rich in texture and can be used both as interior and exterior feature wall to create a statement.  The sample images shows how these blocks are creatively used within a space. Think about what you can do with in the garden, façade, as a room divider, planter, etc. The possibility is endless.

Aesthetically pleasing, easy to install and long lasting, our prediction is that this product is here to stay.

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Peranakan Architecture Style

On 14, Mar 2014 | No Comments | In 1. Planning News, 4. Others | By admin

Peranakan culture is amongst one of the richest and most intriguing, mostly found in Singapore, Malaysia and part of Indonesia. In Australia, it hasn’t been explored as much within the design and architecture industry compared to other design styles such as Chinese, Japanese, etc. Peranakan architecture or also known as Chinese Baroque, Tropical Renaissance architecture amongst many other names, consists of rich and wide range of architectural vocabulary derived from the hybrid of western and eastern styles and traditions

This eclectic architecture is rich, robust and baroque with an abundance of decoration such as use of colourful glazed ceramic tiles with decorative pattern. Other details commonly seen in this architecture style including the free use of the Classical inspired elements, such as the Composite pilasters on sturdy plinths embellished with tiles, and the decorative plasterwork, as well as Malay inspired timber fascia boards and the Chinese inspired bas relief depicting animals under the second-storey side windows.

There has been some modern interpretation of this early 20th century style from residential project to retail fitout. The subtle integration of peranakan influence within a modern minimalist setting translated into a unique style that suits current lifestyle and beyond. This hopefully will keep the rich culture well alive and celebrated many more years to come.

 

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07

Oct
2013

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In Single Dwelling

By admin

The box house published in Arch Daily

On 07, Oct 2013 | No Comments | In Single Dwelling | By admin

Arch Daily — The beginning of this project goes through complex analysis of the environment, starting with the surroundings directly affected by the conservative town planning regulations. The analyses singled out planning controls positively contribute to the immediate surrounding which determined the final shape and envelope of the building. The building envelope and composition of “The Box House” consists of series of boxes interlocked in an organized and formal manner. The rigid formation, however, is “deformed” with the insertion of an organic element in the form of a bamboo courtyard to the centre of the dwelling. This courtyard serves as an incision to the lineal planning of the dwelling in order to provide emission of natural lights and serves as an extension to outdoor spaces.

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06

Mar
2013

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In 4. Others

By admin

3 Clever Building Product Inventions: from yesterday, today and tomorrow

On 06, Mar 2013 | No Comments | In 4. Others | By admin

These products might sound plain, but they are revolutionary, in taking building beyond basic bricks and mortar.

Claimed to be the most used man-made product in the world, we can’t go past reinforced concrete. Concrete has an appearance that equates it aesthetically with ‘natural’ materials such as timber and stone. Mastered and set by the Romans 2,000 years ago, it wasn’t until the early 19th century that its recipe was rediscovered. The basic mix, is a sand and gravel aggregate, bonded with cement and water. Read more…

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